12/16/14

Anderson Pens' Wood Violet


This purple used to be known as Scribal Workshops Nessie. I didn't try that one out, but this version is a very dark purple that shades on the right papers. I said I didn't see it below, but I just didn't look carefully enough, I suppose. It doesn't shade much.

Like some of the other inks in this set, it's a bit on the dry side. It's no where near as dry as Oskosh Denim, but it's not as free-flowing as Green Bay, either. It's somewhere in between. This isn't exactly a performance problem, as it will work perfectly well in lots of pens that tend to run on the wet side. For instance, it wasn't happy in my Monteverde Artista, but it worked really well in my Delta Unica.

The color is well-named, as it looks a lot like the flower of a violet, or even the underside of an African violet's leaves. If you're into purples, and you've got a wet nib laying around, then this is an ink you'll be happy with.


Close Ups!






Sheen?

Sort of. There's just the barest hint of sheen in this ink where it goes down heavily. Don't think you'll see it  very often, though.


Ink Comparisons!


Chromatography!


There's just the barest hint of pink at the top edge. The rest appears to be purple on purple.


Copy Paper Test!



Water Drop Test & Review Video






The Final Words:

I'm not in love with this ink, but it takes a singular purple to make it into my rotation so that's not really a mark against Wood Violet. 

Check it out at Anderson Pens. Bottles are $12.50 for 60ml (2oz), and 3ml samples for $1.25. They appear to be out of the bottles at press time, so grab a sample for yourself.

If you like what you see here, then please head on over to Patreon to see how you can help support Inkdependence.

Thanks very much to Brian and Lisa for sending this ink out for me to try! 

**While this ink was a press sample, the review is all mine.**

12/15/14

Anderson Pens' Oskosh Denim


Oskosh Denim is a dark blue that shades into a good simulacrum of denim. The darkest notes are almost black, while the lightest ones are pretty light blue. It's a nice color. It also doesn't seem to bleed, feather, or spread on copy paper. Those are all good things. 

I say in the review below that it's my least favorite, and that's because the ink just doesn't want to flow very well. It didn't want to work in my Wahl-Eversharp Skyliner, but that nib is a bit finicky. Once you got it going, it was okay, but "getting it going" required priming it with the converter's piston. It wouldn't start on its own. 

Some of these inks are a little on the dry side, so they want a wetter nib. I tried this ink out in my Custom 74, one of the wettest nibs I have, and it was okay. It wasn't great, but it was okay. I think this ink needs something even wetter to get going freely, but I don't have the pen for it. Maybe a dip pen would be the ticket?  



Close-Ups!






Mnemosyne Cards!

 I really like the way that these cards show ink. They're not quite white, but that's okay with me. All of the high-lights show up really well on this paper.

Chromatography!



Copy Paper

 A little bit shows through, but that's only because the ink is a bit dark.

Ink Comparisons!

 You can see it's a bit different from anything I have inked up. 


Video Review and Water Drop Test


The Final Words:

If you've a wet nib that needs taming, and you want an ink that looks like dark bluejeans, then check it out at Anderson Pens. Bottles are $12.50 for 60ml (2oz), and 3ml samples for $1.25. They appear to be out of the bottles at press time, so grab a sample for yourself.

If you like what you see here, then please head on over to Patreon to see how you can help support Inkdependence.

Thanks very much to Brian and Lisa for sending this ink out for me to try!

**While this ink was a press sample, the review is all mine.**

12/11/14

12/10/14

Waterman Serenity Blue


A big thanks to my friends at JetPens.com for sending me this bottle of ink to try out. I do really love getting those little boxes in the mail.

Serenity Blue is a medium blue, but it does take on a mildly purple cast as it dries. Both of the pens that I tried this ink in are on the wet-ish side, but there was never any hesitation from the ink. It was actually a little bit wet, so I'd keep it out of your wet-noodle pens. It was fine in these, but I wouldn't really want to go any wetter with it.

There's some shading apparent on my copy paper test, though there wasn't a whole lot of it. Let's get a closer look at the review.


Close-Ups!




Sheen?
Yep, there's a little bit of that, but not much. You'd really have to get a lot of it on the paper to see it.


Ink Comparisons


Chromatography!

 Blue. Just blue in there. 

Copy Paper Test!

 There are a couple of little dots, but no big deal. 

The Bottle!





Water Drop Test and Review Video






The Final Words


If you're into this purple-y blue ink, then check it out at Jet Pens. At $8.64 for a 50ml bottle, this ink is a great value. It's also a very good blue. It trends towards purple, but it's still a great ink.

If you like what you see here, then please head on over to Patreon to see how you can help support Inkdependence.


Thanks very much to Jet Pens for sending this ink out for me to try!

12/6/14

Anderson Pens' Appleton Red


A red ink to end the school year! Hooray for the winter break!

I used up most of the sample that Brian and Lisa sent out to me. I was trying to figure out if I liked the ink, and I think I do. The color is a solid, bright red, and it behaves well on average papers. Those two qualities make it a good grading ink. And it's named after the charming Appleton, WI where the Anderson Pens shop is located.

The reason it took me so long to decide whether I liked it was that it's temperamental about nibs. I originally put it in a Kaweco Sport with a medium nib. That didn't go well. It was fine at first, but it tended to dry up in the nib and it just didn't want to flow most of the time. That nib is a very moderate one (and I love the color), so I thought maybe this ink just needed a wetter flow. Next up was my Diplomat Optimist. The fine nib on that pen is more like a medium, and it's got a generous flow to it. Appleton Red was better in this nib, but it was still a little hesitant. So, thinks I, let's get this ink into a really wet nib. The broad nib for my Kaweco Sport is the wettest nib that I have. It's almost unusable, it's so wet.

Appleton Red works really well in that nib. It makes that nib useable for the first time since I've had it. So, if you've got a wet nib, this ink will work really well for you. The wetter the better. I bet it would look great in a Triple-Broad or something. In an average or dry nib, this ink won't work very well at all.



Close-Ups!

You'll see below that I have writing samples with both pens here. I think the color is more true in the Kaweco. 



The above is written with the Diplomat, and you can see that it's got a couple of little skips. Just a little too dry to be totally consistent. Of course, I write quickly, so that'll have a had in it too.



Above: Diplomat Fine.
Below: Kaweco Broad




Is that a little sheen? Appears so...
 Compare!
I have several reds on the desk, and they're all a little different. 


Dat Sheen, Tho...
You're not going to see this sheen unless you have a really wet nib, but it's there if you get enough ink on the page. Dip pens, maybe?

 Chromatography!
 Nothin' in this but some red. Maybe just a touch of orange at the top left? 

Copy Paper Test




Video Review and Water Drop Test


The Final Words:

If you've a wet nib that needs taming, then check it out at Anderson Pens. Bottles are $12.50 for 60ml (2oz), and 3ml samples for $1.25.

If you like what you see here, then please head on over to Patreon to see how you can help support Inkdependence.

Thanks very much to Brian and Lisa for sending this ink out for me to try!

**While this ink was a press sample, the review is all mine.**